PlumbingSupply.com® logo
The Leading Online Plumbing Supplier Since 1995
Product Search:

Largest Inventory - Best Service - Lowest Prices
A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z
Same day shipping on in-stock orders placed before 4:30pm Pacific Time M-F



Simple, straightforward and low shipping rates for Case toilet parts.


Hard To Find Case Toilet Repair Parts


If you're looking for replacement parts for your rare Case Old-Style Kidney toilet, you'll find them right here at PlumbingSupply.com®! If you're not sure which Case toilet you have, click here and view all the different models we offer parts for.

Case Toilet Repair Parts - Old Style aka Case Kidney Front Lever
Case Toilets

Case Old Style Repair Parts - Front Lever "Kidney" Toilets

Please note: These parts will fit most front lever "Kidney" toilets, but not all.
Compare your parts to the pictures below before ordering.


Click images below for larger view

Click Image Below Description Price & Quantity
#5129 Flush valve $78.45
#5169 Case Replacement Tank Ball $3.19
#B251 "Will Fit" Tank Ball - extra heavy duty $3.29
We also offer obsolete Case tank lids

- Or -
View Button

Note: parts for side lever Case Kidney toilets are no longer available.





Frequently Asked Questions

Q. "The cost for repair parts for these toilets seems a little expensive, compared to parts for most other toilets. Why is this, and can I use other parts instead?"
A. The Case Toilet Company has been out of existence for a number of decades, and their parts are rare and difficult to find. In relation to the huge number of toilets installed around the world, there are relatively few Case toilets still in use. This makes the need for their parts less common, and so manufacturing them is more costly. However, for the most part, only parts made specifically for Case toilets will work. Click here for hard-to-find Case toilet repair parts.

Q. "What is the best way to replace my tank ball?"
A. Generally, with most toilets: First, turn off the water supply and flush the toilet. The tank ball will most likely be deteriorating and you will get your hands dirty. Or, you may wish to use some latex gloves. Reach in and with one hand lift the wire attached to the tank ball. With your other hand unscrew the tank ball from the lift wire. In some cases, depending on age of product and water conditions, the lift wire may be corroded and break as you try to unscrew the tank ball. Replace the lift wire if necessary. Replace the tank ball with an identical size tank ball. Screw the new tank ball onto the lift wire. Be careful of older brass parts inside your toilet so as not to break or damage them and cause you more problems. Now turn the water back on and allow the tank to fill up. The water fill valve should not leak once the tank is filled (be going on and off in cycles). If it does, then we recommend some food coloring be put into your tank. This can help diagnose the problem. The colored water should not be going into the bowl (unless you flush the toilet of course). If the food color does go into the bowl, then possibly the tank ball is not the correct one or the surface where the tank ball sits has eroded (feel below where the tank ball touches the seat of the flush valve and see if you can feel erosion or possibly a small groove). Also check to make sure the lift wires are not bent and allow the ball to lift and drop easily and centered onto the flush valve seat.

Q. "I installed a new fill valve and it will not shut off completely. The water has reached the float, and the float appears to close the valve. How come the fill valve continues to run?"
A. 1) It could be there may be dirt or debris between the plunger and the seat or in the incoming line of the valve. It is best to turn your water off, remove the plunger from the fill valve. Turn the water back on for a few minutes to flush any dirt or debris out of the valve and the water line. During this process, you may want to cover the fill valve with your hand or a cup to prevent water from spraying you or your ceiling.

2) It may be the float needs to be adjusted. Do not bend the float rod. Adjust the plunger fulcrum arm. To lower the water level, place a screw driver under the middle of cross lever and above the support of the float rod and press firmly on the float rod next to the fulcrum.

Q. "How long 'should' the parts inside of my toilet last?"
A. That depends on a number of variables and which parts. Water quality is one of the major factors. If your water source is heavily chlorinated then many parts won't last long. Or if you have a lot of sand or grit or have a low pH or "aggressive" water source then parts simply won't last as long as the 'average' length of time. Also the quality of the parts matters. The replaceable parts such as flappers and washers/seals generally will last at least 4 to 5 years on "average." If you use a chemical bowl cleaner some flappers won't even last one year. However, some toilet bowl cleaners isolate cleanser from the internal workings of the toilet therefore, maximizing the life of your toilet parts. If your flapper has black "goo" on it then it is either due to age or quality of your water and if it feels soft then it's best to change it.

Have questions about toilet parts or toilet repair?

Read our comprehensive Toilet Repair Information & FAQs to learn how your toilet works,
how to find the right replacement parts, and how to fix common problems.




return to top ↑

We hope that we have helped you on this page with Case toilet repair parts,
and thank you for helping to make PlumbingSupply.com® the most famous Internet plumbing supplier.


Fun, inspirational quote of the day:
"Well, if crime fighters fight crime and fire fighters fight fire, what do freedom fighters fight? They never mention that part to us, do they?"
- George Carlin



Is there something else that you are looking for?

Enter search terms:

OR - find plumbing supplies starting with: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z



Easy payment methods